North Dakota Hunters Educators Association
 
 
 


 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Welcome to NDHEA
 

NDHEA is proud to announce the inaugural Dale Kilwein half marathon to be held in Dickinson August 24th and 25th 2015. Dale’s family is helping to continue promoting Dales passion with education for all persons with their attempt to raise funds to build a Hunters Education Center in Dickinson ND.
NDHEA is proud to be able to assist in this endeavor and ask all interested persons to read the flyer supplied by his daughter Crystal and consider participating in this goal by running, helping, donating, sponsoring or just coming to Dickinson for the fun and games.


Thank you for participating!
 

 

Look for new events on our events calendar page!

Information is available about our upcoming annual meeting and events for North Dakota Game and Fish annual award meeting and workshops coming up!  Click on the link to the left or click here!

NDHEA Executive Board is looking for a person to take the District Representative Position vacated this year by the passing of Dale Kilwein.  This position will be a two year position to begin following the annual meeting in Minot at the Holiday Inn Riverside Motel on February 15th.

If you wish to fill the position, nominate someone for the position, or have general questions, please contact either Clayton Thompson (Clayton.Thompson@noridian.com, 701-238-7897)or Terry Fasteen (TFasteen@gmail.com, 218-790-4734).

 

NDG&F April 20th Newsletter

 

Report Bald Eagle Nest Sightings

While there are likely 125 more active bald eagle nests in the state than 15 years ago, the North Dakota Game and Fish Department continues to monitor this bird that once flirted with extinction.
Sandra Johnson, Game and Fish conservation biologist, said the department is looking for locations of nests with eagles present, not individual eagle sightings.
Johnson said eagles are actively incubating eggs in March and April, and it’s easy to distinguish an eagle nest because of its enormous size.
“While bald eagles were removed from the Endangered Species List in 2007, it’s still important to keep an ongoing list of nesting birds to make sure they are not heading back the way they came,” Johnson said.
Historically, Johnson said eagle nests were found along the Missouri River. Now, they have been observed in more than half of the counties in the state, mostly near streams and mid- to large-sized lakes. However, they are also found in unique areas such as shelterbelts surrounded by cropland or pasture.
Johnson estimates the state has around 140-150 active bald eagle nests.
Nest observations should be reported to Johnson at 701-328-6382, or by email at ndgf@nd.gov.
Observers are asked to not disturb the nest, and to stay away at a safe distance. “It is important not to approach the nest as foot traffic may disturb the bird, likely causing the eagle to leave her eggs unattended,” Johnson said.
 

Camping Restrictions on Some WMAs

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department will continue to implement camping restrictions on some wildlife management areas in western North Dakota and along Lake Sakakawea.
Overnight camping is prohibited on the following WMAs: Antelope Creek, Lewis and Clark, Big Oxbow, Ochs Point, Neu’s Point, Overlook, Sullivan and Tobacco Garden in McKenzie County; Van Hook in Mountrail County; and Hofflund Bay and Trenton in Williams County.
Lewis and Clark and Trenton WMAs are closed from one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise unless users are legally engaged in fishing, hunting or trapping.
However, camping is allowed for paddlefish snaggers only during the open paddlefish season, at the Lewis and Clark WMA Pumphouse area, and by boat access only at Neu’s Point WMA.
In addition, the following WMAs are closed to camping on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, but open to camping Thursday-Monday: North Lemmon Lake in Adams County; Bull Creek in Billings County; Alkali Creek and Spring Creek in Bowman County; Smishek Lake and Short Creek Dam in Burke County; Harris M. Baukol in Divide County; Killdeer Mountains in Dunn County; Camels Hump Lake in Golden Valley County; Audubon, Custer Mine, Deepwater Creek, deTrobriand, Douglas Creek and Wolf Creek in McLean County; Beaver Creek and Hille in Mercer County; Crown Butte Lake and Storm Creek in Morton County; Cedar Lake and Speck Davis Pond in Slope County; and McGregor Dam in Williams County.
On those WMAs where camping is allowed Thursday through Monday, all equipment must be removed on Tuesday and Wednesdays when camping is not allowed.
The Game and Fish Department will lift the Tuesday-Wednesday camping restriction for the week of Memorial Day, May 25-29. This same waiver will allow camping on those WMAs on Tuesdays and Wednesdays during all state-recognized holiday weeks throughout the year, including 4th of July week (June 29-July 3), and Labor Day (Sept. 7-11).
Glass bottles are prohibited on all WMAs. Other camping restrictions at all WMAs are posted at entry points.
These rules ensure that WMAs are available for hunters and anglers.

 

BIG GAME HUNTING APPLICATION DEADLINES: 2015

Many applications were not available yet but are anticipated to start showing up over the next couple of weeks.

Those applications that are know are shown here.

NORTH DAKOTA:
Deer: Non-resident archery March 1st
New fishing license required: April 1 2015
Paddle fishing opens May 1st
Spring Turkey: February 11, 2015
Deer Gun and Muzzle Loader June 3, 2015
Pronghorn Antelope August 5, 2015
Swan Permits August 19th

MONTANA: 2015
Elk: March 16th
Deer: March 16th
Antelope: June 1st
Bear: April
Moose: May
Bighorn Sheep: May 1st
Mountain Goats: May
Bison: May
Elk “B”: June

COLORADO
Spring Turkey: February 12th
Big Game: April 7st, includes:
Elk-Deer-Bear-Moose-Antelope-Bighorn Sheep-Mountain Goats
WYOMING
Moose, Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat and Bison Applications: January 31st
Elk: Jan 31st
Deer: March 15th
Antelope: March 15th
Spring Turkey: January 31
Super Tag: July 1st

NEW MEXICO:
Deer, Elk, Antelope, Bighorn Sheep, Oryx, Ibex, Javelina: March 18

MINNESOTA:
Spring Turkey: April 15th-opener
Deer Bow: September19th
Fall Turkey: October 3rd
Deer Rifle: November 7th
Bear: May 2
Elk: June 13
Camp Ripley Archery: August 15

IDAHO:
Bighorn Sheep-Mountain Goats-Moose: April 30th
Elk-Deer-Fall Bear-Antelope-Fall Turkey: June 5th
 

UTAH:
Elk-Deer-Antelope-Bighorn Sheep-Desert Bighorn Mountain Goats: March 5th

 

Important NDHEA info regarding Mentored Hunts and Family Shooting events

NDHEA is pleased to be offering assistance with funding for Mentored Hunts and Family Shooting Events!

Family Fun Shoot/Mentored Hunt policies

click here to download a copy of the policies

Request for Participation (RFP) to conduct an event

click here to download the RFP form

 

NDHEA QUARTERLY MEETINGS

All meetings are to be held at the North Dakota Game and Fish Department building in Bismarck.

The following meetings will be held instead in Minot ND @
Minot Holiday Inn Riverside
2200 East Burdick Expressway
Minot ND. 58701
701-852-2504
1-800-315-2621
 

  • Fourth Quarter-Feb, 14th 8:00 - 10:00am
  • Annual Meeting is Sunday Feb. 15th 8:30am

2014 Raffle Winners announced!!

 

Drawing held 6-29-2014 5:00 PM at Scheels All Sports – Bismarck ND

 

Winners of this year’s gift cards are as follows

Richard Brewster - Washburn, ND


Cory Hallen - Dickinson, ND


Sheri Ellingson - Grace City, ND


Curt Walen - Carrington, ND


Larry Kukla - Jamestown, ND


Gene Just - Jamestown, ND


Larry Kaul - LaMoure, ND


Scott Pedersen - Northwood, ND


Kerry Whipp - Courtenay, ND


Dale Kilwein - Dickinson, ND
 

THANK YOU! too everyone who help NDHEA this year buy purchasing tickets or helping to sell them. The money will be used to sponsor shooting events, mentored hunting events, promotion for safe hunting and to supply additional teaching aids across the state.

 

Have a great summer and safe hunting season!

 

Coyote Catalog Available for Hunters, Landowners

The North Dakota Department of Agriculture and the North Dakota Game and Fish Department have reopened the Coyote Catalog to connect coyote hunters and trappers with landowners who want fewer coyotes in their areas.
The Coyote Catalog is an online database similar to the one the Game and Fish Department uses to connect deer hunters with farmers and ranchers.
“We’ve had a lot of success matching deer hunters with landowners,” said NDGF Director Terry Steinwand. “We hope the Coyote Catalog works out just as well.”
NDDA officials estimate livestock producers in North Dakota lost more than $1 million last year to coyotes. At the same time, coyotes are a popular furbearer species for hunters and trappers.
“I encourage landowners, especially farmers and ranchers who have problems with coyote depredation, to sign up for the Coyote Catalog,” said Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring. “Hunting and trapping are valuable tools in managing these predators.”
Goehring and Steinwand said the U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services should be the first contact for landowners experiencing coyote depredation of livestock.
Landowners can sign up on the NDDA website at www.nd.gov/ndda/coyote-catalog. Required information includes county and contact information.
Hunters and trappers can sign up at the NDGF website at www.gf.nd.gov.
Periodically throughout the winter, hunters or trappers will receive information on participating landowners, and they can then contact landowners to make arrangements.
Although the Coyote Catalog does not guarantee a good match for every participating landowner or hunter, Goehring and Steinwand said it has great potential to focus hunting or trapping pressure in areas where farmers and ranchers are experiencing coyote depredation problems.
Anyone who registered for the Coyote Catalog in the past must register again to activate their names on the database.
The Coyote Catalog will remain active through March 31, and then start up again next winter.

 

 

NDGF Legislative Update

View the status of outdoor related legislation here

 

 

This is to announce the first ever half marathon to be held in Dickinson! As some of you may know, Dale Kilwein passed away in May of 2014.

Dale was born and raised in Dickinson and was co-owner of B&K Electric. He was very well known in the community, contributed to many organizations and events. He was the lead instructor of the Hunter Safety program in Dickinson for 36 years and was the Region 9 Representative for the ND Hunter Education Association.

He had a true passion for his work but most importantly for the Hunter Education program. Over the years he struggled to have a place to hold classes. A memorial account has been set up at Bank of the West. With the funds we are going to build a facility to hold hunter safety classes in and the opportunity for other local organizations to use. There is a great start in the account, but it is not enough to build a facility. The proceeds raised from the races will go into the account for the construction of the educational building.

The planned events will include a kids race, family 5k, half marathon and half-marathon relay; the runs will have a hunting theme and take place on the Crooked Crane Trail around Patterson Lake. We are looking to make this an annual event and huge success with your help!
We are hoping to have 400+ participants and visitors to participate and help to make our Memorial Run a huge success. Please mark this on your calendar and plan on joining us to bring Dales dream to provide Hunters Education to all persons.

If you have any questions, would like to volunteer your help with the event or assist with the fund raising or provide a personal or corporate sponsorship, please contact: Crystal @ 701-290-5728.
For information on our 501 3C to find sponsorship or donation information, event updates, visit the website @dalefkilweinmemorialrun@gmail.com
 

NDG&F Information

Open Fires Banned on Oahe WMA

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department is prohibiting open burning this spring on property managed south of Bismarck and Mandan, as a means to reduce potential for wildfires on a heavily wooded recreation area along the Missouri River.
Bill Haase, wildlife resource management supervisor, said all open burning, including campfires, is banned until further notice on the Oahe Wildlife Management Area along both sides of the Missouri River. Haase said these woodlands are prone to wildfires prior to spring green-up.
"The combination of mild temperatures and a high fuel load in the river bottoms is of concern," Haase said. "In addition, it is an area of high use by anglers, campers and other outdoor recreationists."
Oahe WMA covers more than 16,000 acres along Lake Oahe south of Bismarck-Mandan, in portions of Burleigh, Emmons, and Morton counties. Burning restriction signs are posted at all entrances to the WMA.
Fire Danger Index

 

Elk and Moose Seasons Set, No Bighorn Sheep Season

North Dakota’s elk and moose hunting seasons are set with more licenses available in 2015 than last year. However, the bighorn sheep hunting season will be closed for the first time since 1983.
A total of 301 elk licenses are available to hunters this fall, an increase of 40 from last year. Unit E1 has an additional 15 any-elk and 15 antlerless licenses, and unit E3 has an increase of 10 antlerless licenses. In addition, the split season antlerless elk only portion of E1 is eliminated to provide additional hunting opportunity and address late-season depredation issues.
A total of 131 moose licenses are available in 2015, an increase of 20 from 2014. Units M9 and M10 have more licenses than last year due to high cow survival and calf recruitment. Hunting units M1C and M4 will remain closed due to a continued downward trend in moose numbers in the northeastern part of the state.
The bighorn sheep hunting season is closed this year due to significant sheep mortality in 2014 caused by bacterial pneumonia. North Dakota Game and Fish Department wildlife chief Jeb Williams said an intensive search during last year’s rut revealed a majority of mature rams in the badlands were among the sheep lost to disease. “The summer 2015 survey will provide more information as to when Game and Fish may be able to re-establish a sheep season,” Williams said.
Online applications will be available March 6 by visiting the Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Paper applications will be on the website for printing, and at license vendors the week of March 9. The deadline for applying is March 25.
Elk and moose lottery licenses are issued as once-in-a-lifetime licenses in North Dakota. Hunters who have received a license through the lottery in the past are not eligible to apply for that species again.
 

Register Now for Hunter Education Classes

Individuals interested in taking a hunter education class in 2015 are reminded to register early as most classes are held the first few months of the calendar year.
To register for a hunter education course, students need to sign up online at the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Many classes will be added over the next several weeks, and the rest will be added throughout the year as they are finalized.
To register, click on the online services tab, and “online course enrollment” under the hunter education heading. Classes are listed by city, and can also be sorted by start date. To register for a class, click on “enroll” next to the specific class, and follow the simple instructions. Personal information is required.
Those who do not have access to the Internet and want to sign up for a class can call the hunter education program in Bismarck at 701-328-6615.
Individuals interested in receiving a notice by email when each hunter education class is added can click on the “subscribe to news, email and text alerts” link found below the news section on the department’s home page. Check the box labeled “hunter education class notification” under the education program updates.
In addition, SMS text notifications of new classes can be sent directly to a cell phone. Simply text “NDGF HunterClass” to 468311 to subscribe to this feature.
State law requires anyone born after December 31, 1961 to pass a certified hunter education course to hunt in the state. Hunter education is mandatory for youth who are turning 12 years old, and children can take the class at age 11.
 

Game and Fish to Conduct Winter Creel Survey

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department has initiated a winter creel survey in the south central part of the state to learn who is fishing and what they’re catching.
“Our guys will be hitting various small district lakes scattered throughout south central North Dakota, primarily in Logan and McIntosh counties and northern Kidder County, where you find clusters of lakes,” said Scott Gangl, department fisheries management section leader.
This region-specific creel survey is a joint effort between the department’s south central and southeastern fisheries districts. The survey could last for several weeks, running into March.
“What we’re after is the size, catch rates, species and the quality of the fishing experience,” Gangl said. “We want to know how far people have traveled to get to a lake and does the distance they’ve traveled influence the size of fish they are harvesting.”
Creel clerks will work mostly on weekends. Anglers who agree to be interviewed will be asked a series of questions, and the clerks will measure harvested fish. Once the interview is completed, anglers will be given an orange card to complete when they quit fishing for the day.
Boxes will be placed at access points for anglers to quickly drop off their cards when leaving the lake. There is no need to stop at a box unless you are returning a card.
 

Mountain Lion Season Closes in Zone 1

Mountain lion hunting during the late season in zone 1 is closed immediately. The zone’s late-season quota of seven was filled after three cats were taken yesterday.
Zone 1 includes land south of ND Highway 1804 from the Montana border to the point where ND Highway 1804 lies directly across Lake Sakakawea from ND Highway 8, crossing Lake Sakakawea then south along ND Highway 8 to ND Highway 200, then west on ND Highway 200 to U.S. Highway 85, then south on U.S. Highway 85 to the South Dakota border.
The mountain lion season in zone 2, which is the rest of the state outside zone 1, has no quota and is open through March 31, 2015.

 

Game and Fish to Maintain Current Deer License System

The State Game and Fish Department has decided to not implement its proposal to limit deer hunters to only one license for the 2015 season.
While it is still months before the 2015 season is set, that means deer hunters will again be able to apply for deer gun and muzzleloader lottery licenses, and also purchase an archery license.
Game and Fish Director Terry Steinwand said the decision involved several factors, including substantial public input both for and against the proposal, and significant costs needed to put the new system in place.
“One of our goals is to increase the deer population statewide, and we can still work toward that under the current system,” Steinwand said.
Under the proposal that Game and Fish offered in early November, in 2015 deer hunters who received a lottery deer gun or muzzleloader license, or a gratis license, would not have been able to purchase an additional archery license.
Game and Fish drafted the proposal based on public input and comments following eight special deer meetings held in February 2014. The meetings were set up to encourage public input on options for changing the way deer licenses are distributed, because of a significant reduction in the state’s deer population.
In 2014 Game and Fish allocated 48,000 deer gun season licenses, compared to more than 140,000 licenses as recently as 2008.
In addition, Game and Fish used the recent fall round of district advisory board meetings to further discuss the resulting proposal. “Over the past year,” Steinwand said, “we’ve had a thorough and healthy discussion on the Department’s role in providing opportunity.”
For instance, in 2013 about 10,000 hunters had both gun and bow licenses, while just over 20,000 prospective hunters who applied for a gun license did not receive any type of deer license.
“This was a social issue more than it was a biological issue,” Steinwand said, “but it is Game and Fish’s responsibility to address how our policies and regulations affect hunters as well as wildlife. We will continue to look at all feasible alternatives for future years that will provide opportunity for the most hunters possible.”
 

Ice Awareness for Hunters, Anglers

Winter anglers and late-season hunters are reminded to consider ice conditions before traveling onto and across North Dakota lakes, as most small and mid-sized waters currently give the appearance of safe foot travel.
State Game and Fish Department boat and water safety coordinator Nancy Boldt said ice thickness is never consistent, especially this time of the year, and can vary significantly within a few inches. “The edges become firm before the center,” Boldt said. “So, with your first step the ice might seem like it is strong enough, but it may not be anywhere near solid enough once you progress away from the shoreline.”
This was apparent last weekend as one hunter experienced this while trying to retrieve a duck that had landed on ice. “He went through up to his neck and his waders filled with water, and the freezing temperature instantly took his breath away,” Boldt said. “He was extremely fortunate to be able to pull himself out, as most people would not have been able to with the extra water weight.”
Boldt said some tips include:

  • Snow insulates ice, which in turn inhibits solid ice formation, and hides cracks, weak and open water areas.
  • Avoid cracks, pressure ridges, slushy or darker areas that signal thinner ice. The same goes for ice that forms around partially submerged trees, brush, embankments or other structures.
  • Ice thickness is not consistent and can vary significantly even in a small area. Ice shouldn’t be judged by appearance alone. Anglers should drill test holes as they make their way out on the lake, and an ice chisel should be used to check ice thickness while moving around.
  • Daily temperature changes cause ice to expand and contract, affecting its strength.
  • The following minimums are recommended for travel on clear-blue lake ice formed under ideal conditions. However, early in the winter it’s a good idea to double these figures to be safe: 4 inches for a group walking single file; 6 inches for a snowmobile or all-terrain vehicle; 8-12 inches for an automobile; and 12-15 inches for a pickup/truck.

These tips could help save a life:

  • Wear a personal flotation device and carry a cell phone.
  • Carry ice picks or a set of screwdrivers to pull yourself back on the ice if you fall through.
  • If someone breaks through the ice, call 911 immediately. Rescue attempts should employ a long pole, board, rope, blanket or snowmobile suit. If that’s not possible, throw the victim a life jacket, empty water jug or other buoyant object. Go to the victim as a last resort, but do this by forming a human chain where rescuers lie on the ice with each person holding the feet of the person in front.
  • To treat hypothermia, replace wet clothing with dry clothing and immediately transport victim to a hospital.

 

Game and Fish to Recommend One Deer License in 2015

A new plan under consideration by the State Game and Fish Department would allow North Dakota deer hunters only one license per year, starting with the 2015 season.
The preferred license distribution plan is the result of a declining deer population and continuing high license demand. “This year we had about 30,000 people who applied for a deer gun license and didn’t get one in the lottery,” said Game and Fish wildlife division chief Jeb Williams. “This new system will give more people an opportunity to hunt deer each year, compared to our current system.”
To gather input on possible changes, Game and Fish held a series of public deer management meetings across the state last winter. Hundreds of people attended these meetings, and many more interested hunters and landowners also provided written or verbal comments on how Game and Fish might manage deer license distribution, given the low population of both whitetail and mule deer in much of the state.
Following the deer management meetings, potential changes were also discussed at the spring round of public Game and Fish advisory board meetings held around the state.
“After evaluating all the input we received last winter,” Williams said, “the general feedback we heard is that hunters understand there is no longer enough licenses so that everyone can get one for the gun season, but at the same time, they don’t feel the current system is equitably distributing licenses, since some hunters can get two or even three licenses when thousands of hunters get none.”
To begin to address that inequity, Game and Fish’s preferred option for 2015 is to limit each hunter to one deer license per year. Williams said that still doesn’t guarantee that every gun hunter who applies in the lottery will get a deer license, but it will eliminate the possibility of someone getting multiple licenses.
If deer populations rebound substantially, Williams said the way licenses are allocated could return to the current system. “However, we are dealing with two dynamics that will make it difficult to do so anytime soon,” Williams added. “We have a deer herd that has been trending downward for several years, and we also have a growing population of people who possibly are interested in North Dakota’s hunting and fishing opportunities.”
In the preferred option, a hunter who is successful in the deer gun lottery would not be able to purchase a bow license or receive a muzzleloader license. However, as a way to provide additional bowhunting recreation, a hunter with a lottery gun license could also hunt with a bow any time during the open archery season, but only for the deer and unit specified on the license.
Resident hunters who apply in the deer gun lottery and do not receive a license, will still be able to purchase a bow license that is valid statewide for any deer.
“This is one of those things that we heard from people who like to hunt with both gun and bow,” Williams said. “They wanted to be able to apply for a gun license, and if they didn’t get one, they could still get a bow license. At the same time, if they did draw a gun license, they wanted a chance to hunt that deer with a bow during the archery season as well.
“We know it’s not the same as having both a gun and a bow license,” Williams added, “but we feel it’s a fair compromise while we work toward rebuilding our deer herd.”
Another part of the preferred option is that hunters would be able to apply simultaneously for the deer gun and muzzleloader lotteries. The application would allow choice of a preference, so if the hunter’s name is drawn and both muzzleloader and deer gun licenses are available at that time, the computer would issue the hunter’s preferred license.
In such cases, the computer would then remove the hunter’s name from the other lottery. Also in that case, Williams said a hunter would maintain the accumulated bonus points for the application that was removed from the lottery.
In addition, Williams said hunters will not lose any bonus points if they choose not to apply for a particular license.
Youth hunters under age 16 would be exempt under the preferred option, and could get a bow license as well as a deer gun or youth season license.
Gratis license holders could hunt in any open season on their own land, but may only get one license per year.
 

Information Sought in Illegal Taking of White-tailed Deer in Emmons County

North Dakota Game and Fish Department district game warden Erik Schmidt is searching for answers in the illegal shooting of four white-tailed deer in Emmons County during opening weekend of pheasant hunting season.
Schmidt said two mature bucks, one a 4x4 and the other a 5x5, were found in a bean field 1.5 miles east of Strasburg. A doe and fawn were found in a stubble field 5 miles southwest of Linton. It is believed all four were shot late evening Oct. 11, or early morning Oct. 12.
Anyone with information is asked to call the Report All Poachers telephone number at 800-472-2121, or contact Schmidt at 701-220-7160. RAP is offering a $1,000 reward.
The RAP line offers rewards for information that leads to conviction of fish and wildlife law violators. Reporting parties can remain anonymous.

 

Sportsmen Against Hunger Accepting Goose Meat

North Dakota’s Sportsmen Against Hunger program can now accept donations of Canada geese taken during the regular waterfowl hunting season.
Previously, the program could accept snow, blue and Ross’s geese during the regular season, but Canada goose donations were only allowed during the early Canada goose season.
This new opportunity for hunters to donate goose meat is part of a two-year pilot program between the North Dakota Game and Fish Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
“In the past couple of years we have heard from many hunters who would like to donate geese taken during the regular season,” said Game and Fish Director Terry Steinwand. “We appreciate the Fish and Wildlife Service setting up this pilot program so we can see how well it works.”
North Dakota Community Action Sportsmen Against Hunger program coordinator Sarah Hasbargen said the additional donations accepted during this pilot project will be a much-needed increase to food pantries across the state. “We will accept as much as hunters are able to donate,” Hasbargen said, while mentioning donated goose meat must be received no later than the day after the close of the season.
Provisions for donating goose meat during the regular season are basically the same as for the early Canada goose season. In addition, hunters can also donate meat from geese that were taken during the early season.
Hunters can bring their geese home and clean them prior to delivering meat to a processor, but breast meat brought from home without a wing or head attached to the meat, must be accompanied by written information that includes the hunter’s name, address, signature, hunting license number, date taken and species and number taken.
Hunters may also deliver geese directly from the field to a processor, but identification must remain attached to the bird until in possession of the processor. Since no goose carcasses or feathers are allowed inside processing plants, hunters must be able to ensure proper disposal and clean-up of carcasses.
The list of participating processors is available on the Game and Fish Department website at gf.nd.gov, and at the NDCAP website, www.capnd.org.
Hunters interested in donating are encouraged to call the processor before dropping off geese, to have a clear understanding of how processors will accept goose breasts, and their hours of operation.
The North Dakota Community Action Sportsmen Against Hunger is a charitable program that raises money for processing of donated goose and deer meat, and coordinates distribution of donated meat to food pantries in North Dakota. It is administered by the North Dakota Community Action Partnership, a nonprofit agency that serves low-income families across the state.
SFor more information, visit the NDCAP website, or contact Sarah Hasbargen at 701-232-2452.